Simple Goals

August 19, 2008 at 12:38 am 4 comments

We have a ton of things to do to get ready for our trip so in amongst the barrage more important things to be checked off our list, I thought I’d share a couple simple goals we’re hoping to achieve in the next two weeks:

  1. Don’t buy any more groceries.
  2. Figure out what to bring for clothes.

The first is hardly as difficult as the second and doesn’t weigh as much on our trip, however, we’re hoping that we can be creative in our food consumption and deplete the already purchased food in our home in a satisfying manner. Figuring that we’ll have at least two or three meals out, the cans of tuna, soup, vegetables, and assortments of frozen delectables should be sufficient until our departure. Creativity will be key and luckily I enjoy baking and will likely whip up some blackberry scones or muffins (blackberries from our yard). The garden is also producing an incredible amount of cucumbers and swiss chard with a smattering of tomatoes (too much rain for them this year), so fresh vegetables are quickly available.

The second, “What do I bring for clothes?” is a typical travel concern but when factoring in the length of my stay, the maximum two fifty pound bags per person, and the shifting climate in Kostanai in the next couple of months, this becomes a challenge.

I did a little research on Kostanai’s climate at the Weather Underground. I love this weather site because it not only gives you valid information on the daily weather, but if you scroll down the page you can click on a link that says, “Weather History for This Location“, and search for past conditions for a certain local.

Keeping my research brief, I looked at Kostanai’s weather for the months of September, October, and November of 2007. I could have checked previous years and averaged the temperatures of multiple years but that just seemed like much more work than I wanted. My summary for 2007 states the month’s average maximum, mean, and minimum temperatures. I also put in the average of a week during each month to help me get a better idea of month’s midpoints.

September Monthly Average
Max- 66
Mean- 55
Min- 44
Mid September, is high 50’s and low 40’s.
Early September is mid 60’s to high 70’s cooling down to high 40’s to mid 50’s in evening.

October Monthly Average
Max- 53
Mean- 42
Min- 31
Early October in the mid 50’s during day and mid 30’s in the evening

The week of October 25: Max-44/Mean-38/Min- 32

November Monthly Averages
Max- 28
Mean- 19
Min- 11
The Week of Nov. 15th: Max- 26/ Mean- 19/ Min- 12

I then compared these temperatures to Maine’s of 2007 and was pleased to find that the temperatures of Kostanai compared similarly to those of Maine for the months of September and October. However, November’s temperatures compared to a typical January in Maine.

How does this help me? I now know what to bring for clothing based on what I typically wear in Maine during the months that compared.

The problem? Because I’m going to be there for the entire length of the adoption (until mid November), I will need to dress for three seasons: summer (early September), fall (September into October), and winter (November). Just bringing the appropriate shoes, boots, coats, mittens, and hats will fill one suitcase…perhaps. We’ll just have to see how I do. This will be quite a challenge! How fun!

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Entry filed under: Kazakhstan Adoption. Tags: , .

Updating Fingerprints Awaiting Visas

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Dawn  |  August 19, 2008 at 7:57 pm

    How exciting for you!!! I have been following your blog for a while now. What a journey! My husband and I are going to Astana…soon…we hope. I am also a teacher (special ed), and the last word we had was to expect travels sometime in September. No date yet. Thanks for sharing your story. It really helps to feel we’re not alone in what feels like the impossible waiting.

    Reply
  • 2. Lanetta Gobble  |  August 21, 2008 at 3:54 pm

    WOW… found your blog and so excited to follow your journey…
    I can’t imagine how stressful the packing part will be… I always try to pack light.. but, something happens along the way.. ha ha…
    this will test my skils for sure… can’t wait to see how you do….
    good luck..
    Lanetta Gobble
    http://www.gobblefamilyadoption.blogspot.com

    Reply
  • 3. Susan  |  August 21, 2008 at 4:01 pm

    wow-you are so organized. 🙂

    just remember…you can buy stuff here too.
    the market is a 3 minute walk from our apt…and they sell EVERYTHING..cheap too.

    today was HOT, hottest so far. I even sweat for the first time. LOL

    and no need for you to bring a flash drive, they have them here.
    they have everything here…except peanut butter. 🙂

    good luck packing-i’t’s a pain, but seriously…market has EVERYTHING and not a lot of money. (if you don’t want to mess with packing so much…)

    Reply
  • 4. Soper  |  August 28, 2008 at 1:38 am

    We adopted from Kostanai three years ago next month (a 1 year old girl, now almost 4). I can tell you one thing about packing clothes: the buildings are super well insulated, and overly heated. LAYER LAYER LAYER, and strip down. You will MELT inside. It’s a wonderful, if exhausting, trip, and I’m jealous of all the great food you’ll get to eat. Dr. Irina is great and takes good care of the children (as best she can on a limited budget).

    Oh, and I had the exact same reaction to the visas. Too funny.

    Reply

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